The Ultimate Guide to Halo Engagement Rings

pear and oval halo engagement rings morganite

Halo engagement rings have become popular in the last 5 years. We believe it will stay "in" as one of the staples for wedding ring styles for future decades. This blog will cover all the styles, benefits and how different diamond cuts can change the look completely.

First off, what is a halo engagement ring? It's exactly as suggested. They are a "halo" looking band of metal that sits right below the girdle (rim) of the center diamond or stone. They feature a diamond pave, held in place with your choice of setting (examples shown below).

The benefit to having a halo is when done correctly, it will give the illusion the center diamond is bigger than it really is. This is because the diamond pave gives you the effect you cannot see where the center stone starts or ends. A great option when working with a tight budget.

Flower Cluster Halo

Cluster halo engagement rings have the diamond pave spaced out like the petals of a flower, held in place by prongs. They are most often seen in vintage or vintage-inspired jewelry.

Hidden Halo

A hidden halo is where the halo is placed lower and tighter around the bottom of the center stone. You can choose between having it completely hidden, only seen when tilted sideways or halfway. A discrete way of adding more diamonds without it being too “loud”.

Double Halo

You aren't limited to one row! Halo rings can have up to 3 rows of pave around the center stone. The more rows the more imposing the piece becomes. Mixing different carat (stone sizes) can also give an interesting look.

Below are examples of different diamond cuts set in halo engagement rings. Scroll down to find your perfect match! Will it be an oval, pear, round, emerald, cushion or a princess cut center stone? We would love to know your answer in the comments below!

Sapphire engagement ring with diamond halopink sapphire engagement ring with oval haloDiamond engagement ring with cushion halo

 



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